The Chinese community in New Zealand’s Christchurch has

stood out following Friday’s terrorist attacks on two mosques, condemning terrorism and expressing their support for the victims by donating money.

Although there was no Chinese casualty in the attacks, the Chinese commu

nity is closely following the situation and cares about all victims, Canton Chamber of Co

mmerce in New Zealand, an organization of local Chinese merchants, said in a statement Saturday.

“No racism, no violence, no terrorism of any form!” said the statement.

The chamber has asked all its members to donate money for the victi

ms and is in contact with the Consulate General of China in Christchurch to voice support and

condolences for the victims on behalf of all Chinese in the city, said the statement.

The University of Canterbury Chinese Students & Scholars Society also expressed shock and regret over the atta

cks on Saturday, saying the atrocities have destroyed many people’s lives and aroused deep anger.

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The cooperation between the museum and Huawei will now

take that to an even higher level, as the new generation of telecoms technology will enrich the ex

perience of visitors to the museum, virtually and in reality, even further. And if conditions become mature in th

e near future, it will not just be visits to the Palace Museum that 5G transforms.

With 5G networks and a smartphone, one will be able to have a consultation with a doctor w

ithout leaving home or give instructions to robotic cleaners to do household chores.

In fact, what the new 5G networks represent is none other than the next technological revolution. There is no reason t

o politicize the arrival of this next-generation technology. Neither is there any reason to demonize what Hu

awei, as one of the world biggest telecoms equipment providers, is doing to usher in this technological revolution.

What is even more dangerous than the harm done to fair competition in the world market is the negative impact the polit

ical barriers some Western countries have put in the way of Huawei will have on the evolution of technology.

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The rules, coming into effect on Jan 1, 2019, also stipulate

that a stay of less than 24 hours on the mainland will not be counted as a day, and the count started from Jan. 1 this year.

The adjustment marked more generous tax exemptions on overseas-sourced incomes of foreigne

rs and non-mainland citizens working in the mainland. The move will attract more foreign investm

ent and overseas talent to work in the mainland, the STA said in a statement on its website.

Previously, the exemption was for tax residents who have lived on the mainland for less than five years.A house collapse triggered by a lan

dslide in North China’s Shanxi province has caused 10 deaths and left another 10 missing, local authorities said Sunday.

As of 10 am Sunday, 16 people had been pulled out of the debris and sent to hospital, but three failed to respond to medical treatment. Seven were found dead at the site.

So far, three of the 13 injured have left hospital after treatment, while 10 remain missing.

The rescuers are searching for the missing with the help of rescue dogs and equipment, the local government said.

The accident occurred at around 6:10 pm Friday in the township of Zaoling in Linfen

city, when a landslide toppled two residential buildings, a makeshift house and a public bathhouse.

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Indian tech billionaire gives $7.5 billion to charitywealth to

  India’s second-richest man is giving billions to charity in what may be the country’s biggest single donation ever.

  Azim Premji, the billionaire chairman of Wipro (WIT), is handing shares in the

tech company worth nearly 530 billion rupees ($7.5 billion) to his philanthropic foundation.

  The tech tycoon has now donated a total of $21 billion to the Azim Premji Foundat

ion over several years, including 67% of Wipro’s shares, the foundation said in a statement.

  Premji, 73, has a fortune of more than $18 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index.

  He was the first Indian to sign the Giving Pledge, a campaign started by Warren Bu

ffett with Bill and Melinda Gates to encourage billionaires around the world to commit most of their wealth to charity.

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Premji accounted for 80% of “large donations” defined as m

  100 million rupees ($1.4 million) — from India’s richest individuals in the 2018 financial year, according to this year’s India P

hilanthropy Report by consulting firm Bain & Company and philanthropy fund Dasra. Private indi

viduals in India donate about 430 billion rupees ($6.2 billion) each year, the report said.

  Wipro was founded by Premji’s father in 1945 as a vegetab

le oil manufacturer, and transitioned to the technology industry in the 1980s under Premji

‘s leadership. It has since grown into one of India’s biggest IT services companies, with more than 160,000 em

ployees worldwide and over 1,200 clients in industries ranging from aerospace to retail.

  Premji’s foundation focuses on supporting education, and ru

ns the Azim Premji University in Bangalore. Its billionaire benefactor’s latest donation coul

d help it open a second university and “scale up significantly,” the organization said.

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This is like saying that because of this atrocity, every whi

  28-year-old man should now be on a watch list or face prejudice. It’s a nonsensical, prim

itive argument. Yet one that elites in powerful positions repeat, even though they should know better.

  The trope that all Muslims are somehow predisposed to violence or terrorism is dangerous an

d wrong. Most Muslims — particularly immigrants — keep their heads down, want a quiet, pea

ceful life and want to stay out of trouble. I know this because I am Muslim and know our community. We are not out to c

ause trouble. We don’t come to “invade”; we come to make a better life for ourselves.

  We run your convenience store, drive your cabs, feed you late-night food when you’ve had a drink or look after you when you’r

e ill. We serve our communities. Yet we have become the victims of harassment, hatred and now terrorism.

  Attacks — verbal and physical — on Muslims are par for the course. But society doesn’t seem to care. Our lives and p

ain don’t seem to matter as much because we are seen as second-class citizens or “bad people.”

  I wept Friday on “CNN Talk,” thinking about the sadness of it al

l. It has been a dark day. But if there is any light, it was the outpouring of grief from people of all

backgrounds around the world who sent in messages of solidarity and kindness. If we can take one lesson from the

horror of Christchurch, we have to stop this hate and see Muslims as human beings, just like anyone else.

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Ahmad Khan said he watched as a man was shot dead in his

  A total of 49 people were killed in the mosque attacks on Friday. The massacre has stunned residents, not just because it happen

ed there but also because it was planned to show the world that even the most peaceful places are not immune to terror.

  Australian citizen Brenton Tarrant, 28, has been charged with one count of murder. Two other peo

ple remain in police custody. New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern described it as “one of New Zealand’s darkest days.”

  Khan wasn’t the only member of his family touched by the shootings. A few blocks away

, at the Al Noor mosque, Khan’s uncle is believed to be one of 41 people gunned down there while praying.

  On Saturday, families waited patiently as officials worked to identify bodies. Yet while confirmation will bring some closure, questio

ns will linger as to how such a horrifying event can happen in a country many consider safe.

  ”We felt it was such a safe city, such a safe country,” a 30-year-

old construction project manager, who did not want to be named, told CNN. “The hatred has spread everywhere.”

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William, Kate, Harry and Meghan condemn “horrifying assault”today.

  William and Kate, The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, and Harry and Meghan, The Duke and Duchess of Sus

sex, have said they have all spent time in Christchurch and its “open-hearted and generous” people.

  They condemned the violence on the Muslim community, calling it “horrifying assault on a way of life that embodies decency, community, and friendship.”

  ”No person should ever have to fear attending a sacred place of worship,” the royal couples said in a statement.

  Here’s the full statement:

  Our hearts go out to the families and friends of the people who lost their lives in the devastating attack in Christchurch.

  We have all been fortunate to spend time in Christchurch and have felt the warm, open-hearted and generous spirit that is core to its remarkable people.

  No person should ever have to fear attending a sacred place of worship.

  This senseless attack is an affront to the people of Christchurch and New Zealand, and the broader Muslim comm

unity. It is a horrifying assault on a way of life that embodies decency, community, and friendship.

  We know that from this devastation and deep mourning, the people of New Zealand will unite to show that such evil can never defeat compassion and tolerance.

  We send our thoughts and prayers to everyone in New Zealand today.

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Showing off sometimes diabolical but compelling politic

  skills, Trump was audacious, provocative and spiteful. He made outrageous boasts about his own success and hin

ted at his acute sense of human nature and feral appreciation of weakness and discomfort in a political opponent.

  Trump also showed his indifference, or rude disregard for the political plights of allied le

aders, indulged his willingness to trade in falsehoods, and betrayed his obsessions with his predecessor President Barack Obama.

  At Thursday’s White House meeting, Trump was also asked by a reporter about the fre

shest entrant in the Democratic White House race — former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke. He was ready.

  ”Well, I think he’s got a lot of hand movement. I’ve never seen so much hand movement. I said is he crazy or is that just the way he acts.”

  ”Study it, I’m sure you’ll agree,” Trump told reporters.

  The jab at O’Rourke was not just a throwaway. It was a return to the forensic

targeting of political opponents that helped Trump dismantle the Republican primary field in 2016.

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Mocking O’Rourke’s gestures might seem a frivolous at a time

  of national political angst and with a heavy duty policy debate already under way. But Trump is an expert at trivializing and belittling opponents, to de

tract from the gravity of their arguments and to feed the conservative media machine.

  His diagnosis of Jeb Bush’s “low energy” four years ago established a narrative about the former Florida gove

rnor’s campaign that hinted at a grain of truth. The one-time GOP front-runner could never recover.

  Trump vs. Brexit — and Obama

  At one point in the meeting Tump, said he wasn’t going to “comment on Bre

xit,” but characteristically unable to constrain himself, could barely leave the topic alone.

  At the start of his meeting, Trump welcomed Varadkar, and poin

ting out that his visitor was in a difficult position over Britain’s tortured attempts to comp

lete its withdrawal from the European Union, which could harm Ireland’s peace and prosperity.

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